The Person-Centered Background Effect

The person-centred approach is a widespread practice nowadays. It says that we should trust in our self-perception and we can determine our well-being through a proper understanding of our situation and needs. It means that there is no need to value unconscious motives and meanings derived from other sources by counsellors. Proposed by Roges (1959), it says that we are capable of organizing our beliefs, concepts, and self-perceptions. Our self-concept is central to our perceptions about others and the world. The self-concept might be different from the reality of what we are in reality. We might think that we are strong; however, in fact, we could be assessed as shy and feeble personality.
I am entirely in favour of such thoughts. We know what we are and we can very quickly be guided in that light. However, when we are in trouble, our unconscious mind dictates to us what we don’t want to listen in reality. Suppose you are going to save someone’s life and your belief tells you that it might put you in trouble. Or the reverse case, you want to do something refreshing and funny; however, your mind says you to do something generous and moral. What we do, choose, figure out, decide to do, or think about all depend upon our unconscious thought that is present in all times and that is subject to change. We do not pay attention to that thought and react as we think we are doing.
For example, we are going shopping with a great mindset. It is straightforward to guess; we will have excellent shopping experience following that. Another side, with sad and muggy mood, we will make many mistakes in shopping or will not enjoy that experience thoroughly.

Our most of the problems are based on our perception of the situation. We do not understand what is wrong with us. We blame others for our miseries and issues; however, it is not right for most of the time. When psychologist uncover our background information at that particular time ( the time of misery ), the real cause for our pain comes out of the shadow. We feel great relief at that moment. So the hidden unconscious information/perception of the situation is the most important thing to discover.
For example, a person is very much lonely due to his family members behaviour. He thinks he is being ignored and not given much importance. Here, the belief ‘the importance given by family ‘ is fundamental to be discovered. In other situations, other ideas might work as a background. Those beliefs play an essential role in our decision making, role-playing, acting and reacting and even thinking.
Thanks TH

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